MG Classics,
BOOKS 1, 2 &3

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Some cars became classics because there were so few. MGs became classics even though there were so many. The world’s best known sports car, MGs were already an institution by the 1930s, founder Cecil Kimber having set an industry example of niche marketing followed for the rest of the 20th century and beyond. Rarely expensive or fast, MGs exemplified the sports two-seater in its purest form. An open MG became an aspiration of the young at heart throughout the world; the brand bolstered by a sporting reputation that transcended outright victories. MGs were class winners, as in the 1933 Mille Miglia, or won epic events on handicap like the 1934 TT when the great Tazio Nuvolari drove the splendid K3. MG’s survival in the rough and tumble of the motor industry was testament to a status forged when the charismatic Midget of 1929 lit a spark of enthusiasm throughout an era of MG classics never really extinguished. Absorbed into conglomorates and out again, MG’s industrial history was at best diverse. Its survival for the best part of a century was a testament to the affection it earned among keen skilled drivers who believed in Safety Fast.


MG CLASSICS Vol. 1: 1922 - 1939

MG Classics Book 1 covers 1922-1939 with a detailed history of MG’s foundation by Cecil Kimber and WR Morris, through its struggles in the aftermath of the first world war to its triumphs before the outbreak of the second. An offshoot of the burgeoning Morris Motors based in the university city of Oxford, MG became self-sufficient at a small factory in rural Berkshire by the 1930s. It achieved sporting success at Brooklands and in the Mille Miglia, creating a niche for a new kind of motor industry product, the small sporting two-seater.

Forty-seven distinctive examples of MG are detailed, illustrated and described in MG Classics Book 1, along with the comprehensive specifications that have gained Dove Publishing motor books their reputation for accuracy and authenticity. Chronicles of speed records and motor sporting successes make the MG Classics series unique sources of facts and figures.

  • 1933 K3 Magnette Ulster TT Nuvolari car

  • 1933 K3 Magnette single seater

  • 1933-1934 L-type Magna

  • 1934 PA Midget

  • 1934 EX135

  • 1934 Q-type Midget

  • 1934-1936 N-type Magnette

  • 1934-1936 NE Magnette

  • 1935 NE Magnette Musketeer

  • 1934 EX154

  • 1934-1936 PB Midget

  • 1935 P-type Midget Le Mans team car

  • 1935 R-type single seater

  • 1936-1939 SA 2.0 litre saloon

  • 1936-1939 SA Tickford Coupe

  • 1936-1939 TA Midget

  • 1936-1939 VA 1½ litre

  • 1938 TA Cream Cracker

  • 1939 WA 2.6 litre

  • 1939 TB Midget

  • 1922 Sports Morris Cowley Chummy

  • 1926 14/40 and MkIV

  • 1927 14/40 Featherweight Fabric saloon

  • 1928 18/80 Mk 1

  • 1928 18/80 Mk II

  • 1928-1931 18/80 Mk II Speed Model

  • 1930-1931 18/100 Mk III Tigress

  • 1930 M-type 8/45 Midget Double Twelve

  • 1930 EX120 Eyston’s first Montlhéry car

  • 1931-1932 C-type Midget

  • 1931-1932 F1 12/70 Magna

  • 1932 12/70 F2 F3 Magna

  • 1932-1934 J1 Midget

  • 1932-1934 J2 Midget

  • 1933-1934 J3 Midget

  • 1933-1934 J4 Midget

  • 1932 EX 127 Magic Midget

  • 1932-1933 Magnette K1 (engines KA KB KD)

  • 1932-1935 Magnette K2 (KB and KD engines)

  • 1933-1934 Magnette K3


MG Classics, VOL. 2: 1945 - 1965

Following the Second World War in which MG at Abingdon-on-Thames made the centre section of the Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle aircraft and overhauled battle tanks, getting back to sports cars was a priority. Some pre-war lines such as the Jaguar-like SA VA and WA were unsuitable, but the T-series was brought back to production in September 1945. Returning American servicemen ensured it received a good reception in an export market crucial to a country whose reserves were exhausted by war. The TC was followed by Y-series, modest quality saloons and convertibles perfectly in tune with the austere times.

By the 1950s MG was back in motor racing at Le Mans and nurturing clubmens’ sport in Britain. TD, TF and Magnette were landmarks as Nuffield was assimilated into the British Motor Corporation (BMC), and the 1950s MGA was replaced in 1962 by the definitive unitary construction open 2-seater the MGB. Abingdon also made Rileys and Austin-Healeys, returning to its roots with the development of the Sprite and Midget, based on derivative principles established by founder Cecil Kimber after the First World War. When BMC resolved to get back into motor sport, MG headquarters at Abingdon was quickly designated home of a Competitions Department that made Britain a world class player.

  • History of MG Classics 1945-1965

  • MG Model by Model 1941-1965

  • 1945-1949 TC Midget

  • 1947-1951 YA 1¼ litre saloon

  • 1948-1950 YT 1¼ litre open 4-seater

  • 1947 Coachbuilt Y-types

  • 1949-1953 TD Midget

  • 1949 George Phillips Le Mans TC

  • 1950-1953 TD Mk II

  • 1951 EX 172 George Phillips Le Mans TD

  • 1951-1953 YB saloon

  • 1952 EX175 prototype MGA

  • 1953-1954 TF Midget 1250

  • 1953 Arnolt, Ghia-Aigle, and Shipsides

  • 1953-1956 Magnette ZA

  • 1954-1955 TF 1500

  • 1954 EX179

  • 1955 EX182 Le Mans team cars

  • 1955-1959 MGA

  • 1956-1959 MGA Coupe

  • 1956-1958 Magnette ZB

  • 1957-1959 EX181 record car

  • 1957-1959 EX186 proposed Le Mans car

  • 1958-1960 MGA Twin Cam

  • 1959-1961 Magnette Mark II

  • 1959-1961 MGA 1600 Tourer and Coupe

  • 1960 Ted Lund Colin Escott Le Mans coupe

  • 1960 EX220 and ADO34 front wheel drive MG prototype

  • 1961-1962 MGA 1600 Mk II Tourer and Coupe

  • 1961-1962 MGA 1600 De Luxe

  • 1962 1600 De Luxe Mark II

  • 1961-1968 Magnette MkIV

  • 1961-1962 Midget GAN1

  • 1962-1964 MG Midget GAN 2

  • 1962-1968 MG1100

  • 1962-1967 MGB

  • 1964-1966 Midget Mk2 GAN3

  • 1964 EX234 Hydrolastic MG

  • 1964 O-series MGB

  • 1964 Dick Jacobs Midget Coupe

  • 1964 MGB Sebring racer

  • Chronology of MG speed records

  • Chronology of MG Sports

  • Chronology of MG


MG Classics, VOL. 3: 1965 - 2001

MG Classics Book 3 covers the years 1965-2001 and follows the closure of the traditional factory at Abingdon-on-Thames in 1980 after the turbulence of the British Leyland years and the transition to MG-Rover. Despite modest resources MG remained able to keep up with the times, meeting stringent safety and emissions regulations imposed by world markets with landmark cars such as the MGB GT while widening its appeal with adaptations of mainstream models engineered by associate and parent companies.

  • 1966-1969 Midget Mk III GAN 4

  • 1965-1967 MGB GT

  • 1967-1969 MGB

  • 1967-1969 MGC

  • 1967-1969 MGC GT

  • 1968 MGC GTS Sebring racer

  • 1968 MG 1300

  • 1969-1974 Midget Mk3/4 GAN4/5

  • 1972 SSV1 Experimental safety vehicle

  • 1973-1976 MGB GT V8

  • 1974-1979 Midget 1500 GAN6

  • 1975-1980 MGB (rubber bumper)

  • 1975 MGB GT Anniversary

  • 1980 MGB Limited Edition, roadster and GT

  • 1980 MG Aston Martin proposal

  • 1982-1990 MG Metro 1300

  • 1983-1990 MG Metro Turbo

  • 1983-1984 MG Maestro 1600

  • 1984 MG Metro 6R4

  • 1984-1991 MG Montego 2.0 EFi

  • 1984-1991 MG Maestro 2.0 EFi

  • 1985-1991 MG Montego Turbo

  • 1985 MG EX-E

  • 1989-1991 MG Maestro Turbo

  • 1992-1994 RV8

  • 1995 MGF 1.8i

  • 1995 MGF 1.8i VVC

  • 1997 EX253 1988 EX255 Andy Green Utah car

  • 1998 MGF Super Sports Concept

  • 2000 MGF

  • 2000 MGF Super Sports Mk II

  • 2001 MGF Trophy and MGF 1.6i 112PS

  • 2001 MG X20 X30

  • 2001 MGF 1.8i 120PS; sequential CVT, 1.8VVC MG TF

  • 2001 MG X10

  • 2001 MG-Lola EX257 Le Mans prototype

  • 2002 MG ZR 1.4, 1.8

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